Monday, December 16, 2013

Month 3 of Kitchen Remodel

Yes, I realize we skipped over a few weeks. Life has been fraught with roadblocks and delays. The hubbs has been working a tremendous  number  of hours--which has definitely cut into the project. My step-Dad has been busy with his job as well as some personal issues, so the remodel came to a screeching halt for a few weeks.

To be honest, I am exhausted. I am tired of living in a construction zone. I am tired of not having a kitchen and cobbling meals together in a space more dysfunctional  than my kitchen ever was considered....sigh

I have been overwhelmed with school and finishing the semester with final exams. Stress has taken it's toll and I did NOT make the dean's list his semester--which is the first time in my academic career (including college 20 yrs ago). I am gearing up for my internship which begins in January. I will be working (for free) and I have 5 classes so I can graduate in May. No pressure! It had been my hope to have the remodel off my plate before Christmas January but that is not the case.

We had Thanksgiving both at my sister's and my daughters house. Two days of feasting and just enjoying the moment. Although my daughter and I did share the kitchen and cook--surprisingly without argument or harm inflicted on the other, haha.

Now for the kitchen...
All the insulation and wiring is complete (with the exception of being hooked to the box). The electrician was supposed to have been out this past Saturday but couldn't. HOPEFULLY next Saturday, fingers crossed. Once he wires everything in, we can assume all is good,  tape up the seams of the insulation and install drywall.


The installation of the recessed lights was a fun exercise in math and patience. We have 5 lights installed. I based the calculations for spacing of manufacturer recommendations and my preference. The center of the lights are spaced to hit the edge of the counter, which is supposed to avoid weird shadows. This was 25 inches from the wall. From the side walls they were supposed to be offset 12-18 inches and 18-24 inches between lights. Weeellllll, that didn't quite work out because the 2nd story joists were not equally spaced. A couple of the cavities required a sander to the housing could fit. Mathematically, the fixtures are not perfect but they are aesthetically pleasing to the eye. I doubt once everything is installed and painted, that anyone will notice the imperfections. Oh yeah, my light fixture I ordered had a snafu--I was sent the wrong one. The correct one is en route and should be here in 7 business days.  sheesh



The sub-floor has been installed. And I have to say--It looks like bamboo! If I had known it looked so nice, I would have left it exposed and varnished it. As a matter  of fact the hubbs bet my step-dad that is what I want to do, haha. I guess he knows me! However, since I already had the linoleum we are moving forward with that.  The hubbs and my step-Dad installed rosin paper to protect the sub-floor from the mess of installing drywall.


So no Christmas dinner in the new kitchen. The default plan is to have dinner at the kids house. I know as soon as the drywall goes in the project will pick up speed.  Fingers crossed we can get back on track and finish this  without further delays. I think a finished kitchen would make a GREAT anniversary gift (Valentine's Day) ... ok ST. Paddy's Day?... um ..Easter?

Hopefully next post will see more changes and I can have lots of things crossed off the list!






Saturday, November 9, 2013

Week's 7 and 8 of kitchen remodel

I am so happy y'all!! My kitchen is beginning to resemble a room again instead of squatter's squallor.

Buh-bye meat locker and hello coziness as the insulation goes in to warm us up and help reduce the utility bill. 
The hubbs hard at work.
The hubbs made a minor mistake when he placed the outlet box considering a cabinet will be in front of it. So it needs to be moved up for counter height use.

Hey look--a header over the window on a load bearing wall!. No more worrying about the 2nd floor crashing down.

Hello brand new shiny window with your low-E energy efficient double panes. Not only are you gonna save me money, you are short which allows me to have a whole run of cabinets with countertop in what was previously wasted space.

The new wall has been built for the sink, dishwasher and refrigerator area. The wall was out of plumb by 3 and 3/8 inches and the floor in the area was 2 inches off prior to the repair (see post for weeks 5/6). This wall was pre-built so it is square-maybe the only square thing in the entire house. When installed it was shimmed to be level and plumb. We now have a true surface on which to drywall and hang cabinets. And how cool is this? You can see an outline of the stairs on the plaster and lath boards. (which I highlighted in red). We are going to use some plywood and close off the old back porch door frame.

Budget constraints forced me to go with 6 inch recessed lights. I had originally wanted 4 inch LED's which I talked about HERE. However the cost would have been $339 for 8 recessed lights. Lowe's had a contractor special on 6 inch recessed lights, a case of 6 including trim kit and along with a package 6 of  lights, I was out the door out the door for $88.19. The main light fixture has been ordered and will be here next week.  I went with my original choice of Madison, except I found it for $122.58 (not counting my 5% discount) at ATG stores (which is a Lowe's subsidiary) instead of the $138.96 at Home Depot. Every little bit of savings counts at this point!

I know it doesn't look "pretty" yet  but to me it is such a beautiful sight. If all goes well, we hope to begin drywall next weekend.


Here's my list from my earlier kitchen remodel post with some additions/ modifications
  • Finish tearing out the plaster and lathe on the North wall
  • Tear out ceiling
  • Cut out the wall boards in the sink area to remove mold. It appears to be contained in a few spots. Decided to do a complete tear out
  • Patch/ repair the remaining 2 walls. Possibly skim coat. Decided to do a complete tear out
  • Build temporary supports for new headers over door and window.
  • Bleach and Odo-Ban the walls and allow to dry. 
  • Cut out a  2 foot by 8 foot floor section (sink area)
  • Sister the joist beams and shim where the floor slopes
  • Determine if sill plate needs repaired  Damage is minimal-yay!
  • Install a floor jack on North-East corner--where the the sill plate is water damaged
  • Move the stove outlet from floor to the wall and update to a new receptacle-IN PROGRESS
  • Install necessary outlet for gas hookup (no connection to line, preparing in advance for stove replacement)--Maybe--checking on requirements Decided to scratch this for now
  • Build bump out wall (west wall/ kitchen sink side) to accommodate for out of plumb wall.
  • Lay a new subfloor
  • Install the linoleum
  • Replace, update and attach the outlet to a stud on east wall
  • Add 1-2 new receptacle(s) to the east wall (window wall)
  • Add 1 new receptacle to west wall-IN PROGRESS
  • Purchase recessed light housing and trim kits
  • Order focal/ center light
  • Move center junction box, update and wire in a wall a 2 way switch for the ceiling fixture. IN PROGRESS 
  • Install recessed lights perimeter of the kitchen (3 on each wall) and install dimmer switch. IN PROGRESS
  • Install/ wire in electric for stove exhaust hood
  • Replace the window
  • Attach furring strips to the exterior walls (North and East) to bump out the depth
  • Insulate and seal. Minimize any possible cracks, leaks or vermin/bug/ draft entry points-IN PROGRESS
  • Install furring strips to bump out north wall (entry door wall) so drywall is flush with door frame
  • Drywall, mud, tape, prime and paint
  • Purchase end  panel for dishwasher installation
  • Order remaining counter top (stove side of the kitchen)
  • Order and install stove exhaust hood
  • Install flooring
  • Install new door
  • Install cabinets
  • Purchase and install cabinet hardware
  • Install sink
  • Purchase  tile for back splash
  • Install tile back splash (sink area), considering back splash installation on stove side
  • Purchase and install a dishwasher
  • Move the Refrigerator and Stove in fromthe  garage
  • Trim work (doors, the window, baseboards, crown molding)
  • Decide on window treatment
  • Order fabric for window valance/ curtains/ shade
  • Paint  mobile island/ cart
  • DIY some wall art
  • Purchase/ DIY 2 kitchen stools
Finger's crossed I am done by Christmas!  I am still hopeful we will meet this deadline.





Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Week's 5 and 6 of Kitchen Remodel

Week 5 was bad news due to  a man down...the hubbs hurt his back which meant no work for the both the kitchen and his job. The good news is he has recovered and is back to his normal grumpy self, ha.

Week 6 saw the bad portion of the floor cut out


and replaced

I wasn't there for all the drilling and lag bolt tie in of the sister joist beams- so no pics.  It took 2 layers of  plywood and countless shims to get the floor level in that section. There was a 2 inch slope over 4 feet, yikes! Every thing is nice tight now now. We still have 1 teeny tiny little section of linoleum that refuses to come up, so not sure what to do about that yet. There is still some slope to the floor but any gaps will covered with baseboard wrapping the cabinets.

We found out why the old wall cabinets sagged so much. We have a 3 and 3/8 off plumb slope on the wall. So the cabinets won't be level or flush if we leave it as is. Our solution-thanks to my brother in law-is to build a false wall, shim it and tie it in to the existing wall so we can have a true structure to mount the cabinets. We are going to lose 4 inches from the kitchen but it won't impact the floor plan.

The plumbing had to be cut and moved to accommodate this fix. The good news is 1) the plumbing can be ran up the wall and will be more accessible from the basement in the event of a repair and 2) since the wall is being bumped out and out basement/ cellar/ dungeon is very drafty is sends the cold air up to the kitchen, we have decided treat it as an outside wall and insulate. Which will be fantastic because the room is like frigid meat locker right now, bbbrrrr.

Week 7 will see the wall build out, beginning of the electrical and insulation installations.

Here's my list from my earlier kitchen remodel post with some additions/ modifications
  • Finish tearing out the plaster and lathe on the North wall
  • Tear out ceiling
  • Cut out the wall boards in the sink area to remove mold. It appears to be contained in a few spots. Decided to do a complete tear out
  • Patch/ repair the remaining 2 walls. Possibly skim coat. Decided to do a complete tear out
  • Build temporary supports for new headers over door and window.
  • Bleach and Odo-Ban the walls and allow to dry. 
  • Cut out a  2 foot by 8 foot floor section (sink area)
  • Sister the joist beams and shim where the floor slopes
  • Determine if sill plate needs repaired  Damage is minimal-yay!
  • Install a floor jack on North-East corner--where the the sill plate is water damaged
  • Move the stove outlet from floor to the wall and update to a new receptacle
  • Install necessary outlet for gas hookup (no connection to line, preparing in advance for stove replacement)--Maybe--checking on requirements
  • Build bump out wall (west wall/ kitchen sink side) to accommodate for out of plumb wall.
  • Lay a new subfloor
  • Replace, update and attach the outlet to a stud on east wall
  • Add 1-2 new receptacle(s) to the east wall (window wall)
  • Add 1 new receptacle to west wall
  • Purchase recessed light housing and trim kits
  • Order focal/ center light
  • Move center junction box, update and wire in a wall a 2 way switch for the ceiling fixture. 
  • Install recessed lights perimeter of the kitchen (3 on each wall) and install dimmer switch
  • Replace the window
  • Attach furring strips to the exterior walls (North and East) to bump out the depth
  • Insulate and seal. Minimize any possible cracks, leaks or vermin/bug/ draft entry points
  • Drywall, mud, tape, prime and paint
Finger's crossed I am done by Christmas!

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Light up my life

How hard can it be to pick out ONE stinking light fixture? Apparently rather difficult since I can't decide. I talked about 4 of my choices HERE. I asked for feedback on the blog, my personal facebook page and my blog facebook page.

The results are...drum roll please...
33.3% for #1
33.3% for #2
33.3% for #3
Although 67% agree #3 is a beautiful light just not suited for a kitchen.
Y'all are nothing but decisive, haha! 

So here were are with round 2. 
There were comments about how many of the selections  looked "ordinary". You know what, I have to agree. I don't want anything too crazy but I don't want my kitchen to look like anyone else's either. So I did some more searching the web and found a few additional lighting choices that caught my attention.

This was an interesting find and has an "antique" flavor that is sure to match the vibe of my 1881 farmhouse. It does come in an option of brushed nickel eve though it is shown in oil rubbed bronze. Reasonably priced $188.00.
Pro's-Price, eye catching
Con's-Slightly resembles an outdoor light fixture
Galaxy, brushed nickel
I like the "old fashioned meets modern twist" of this fixture. $199.90
Pro's-Price, eye catching
Con's-The glass shade is a bug collector
Livex, brushed nickel

This reminded me of a captain's wheel. Ahoy there matey...arrrggg!  Very unusual. Shown in bronze but does come in a nickel finish. $356.20
Pro's-Unique
Con's-PRICE and design might not be suited to my kitchen
Lustarte, brushed nickel
How about industrial schoolhouse?   Now class--you need to settle down...$279.00
Pro's-unique
Con's-PRICE
Hudson Valley, brushed nickel
Okay I am completely crushing on this fixture. First-the Edison style bulbs are so very cool and 2nd the glass shade reminds me of an Erlenmeyer flask (a nod to my 20+ years working as a chemist). Mad Scientist, mwhahahaha..um .... $199.00
Pro's-Unique, price
Con's- cost of replacement bulbs and a slightly darker finish than what I had envisioned for the space
Hinkley, antique nickel

 Please leave me a comment as to which you would choose and why.




Sunday, October 6, 2013

Week 4 of Kitchen Remodel



I know I had said  previously we weren't going to take the ceiling down but my step dad poked around a bit and decided there was no asbestos. To be on the safe side the tiles were misted with water to hopefully prevent any airborne particles, the rest of the house was resealed with a double layer of taped in place plastic, fans were installed to pull air out of the kitchen and the guys put on respirators. 

The aftermath looks like a wrecking ball hit the place. There is an avalanche of debris. We gained 4 inches of ceiling height because of all the layers. Acoustical tiles, luan board, 2 x4's across the plaster, tar paper, plaster board and lathe. 


Of course this means I can have lights I want wired in the places I pick and NOT have track lighting--WOOT!

So I am thinking these around the perimeter of the room 3 each spaced equi-distant and set 15-18 inches from each wall, which puts them 3-6 inches from  the cabinets.  They can be dimmed, aimed and do not have a large housing. Not to mention a 4 pack is $169, complete with trim. Two of these please...
4 inch white LED
I think for my main light fixture -which will now be centered in the room-yay! It's the little things, haha I am undecided between these.

Downward light priced at $138.96
Pro's-Inexpensive, Easy to clean the glass shades (bugs can't collect inside them)
Con's-Looks generic/ inexpensive, No bulb diffuser
Madison, Brushed Nickel
Upward light priced at $258.00
Pro's-Looks slightly higher end, no light bulb glare
Con's-price, shades will collect bugs
Sierra, Brushed Nickel
Upward light with shade, $99.97
Pro's-Price and GORGEOUS!
Con's-Fabric shade-not suitable to a kitchen, too fanciful, more of a dining room type light fixture
Gala, Polished Nickel
Downward light, Glass shade , $64.96
Pro's-Price, Glass shade, Diffuse light, simple lines
Con's-Bug Collector shade, slightly modern
Hampton Bay, Brushed Nickel
So what light fixture would you choose? 


Friday, September 27, 2013

Week 3 of Kitchen Remodel

Or as I like to call it...How many things do you see wrong in these pictures?
Kitchen window--improper header
Kitchen door-NO header
Sink wall--original entrance into the basement/dungeon/cellar
Obviously  these will be corrected even though they have been like this for over fifty years. The old entry opening will be blocked with some studs to support the drywall . The door and window will require temporary supports be built and the header and king studs be tied in to the existing studs. This goes a long way to explaining the broken seal on the window and a warped door. The door frame has a bow in it from the unsupported weight settling over time. On the other side of the studs (exterior) there are some steel studs which is why the house didn't come crashing down after the addition in 1960's. But I feel since the walls are open we might as well do this right.

We had to plastic over the sink wall since it opened to the basement/ dungeon/ cellar. The smell is awful. It is a combination of mildew and  musty stagnant air. We have fans going  but it is killing my allergies. The odoban will go on this weekend. That should go a long way to get rid of the 132 years of funk...yuck!!

It has been slow going. Very little work was done Labor Day week because the hubbs was on call for his job and  I was overwhelmed with assignments for school. To be honest it took us this long to get rid of our debris from the 3 wall that have been demolished. We didn't have the money to rent a dumpster, so we have been setting the garbage out over the last 3 weeks so as to not go over our allowed pounds of trash and incur extra charges. We have all the lath strips we have accumulated so far in a burn pile in the back yard.

After careful inspection we decided not to pull the ceiling down. There is a layer of insulating acoustical tiles glued onto the what we are assuming is plaster. We have checked the integrity and everything is solid.  Of course there is also the possibility those tiles contain asbestos. Not something we want to mess with...ever!

The hubbs and my step-dad did a little exploration to located the ceiling studs and marked them. The glued tiles will be wiped down with TSP and then some bleach, allowed to dry before installing the drywall over the existing ceiling. 3-31/2 in screws will hold everything nice and tight.

Of course this blew my lighting plan to install recessed lights. Instead we will go with a track light system. The trick is for me to find something not ugly, not expensive and not overly modern. The existing junction box will remain in the current location. There will be a minimal of poking around to run a switch. It appears the beam run east-west and so does the existing wire. The switch will be located on the sink wall closest to the entry.

These are the 2 options I am considering for track lighting.
Lowe's Portfolio 6 light Bushed Nickel

 with this
Home Depot Hampton Bay Flex Steel

The good news is  1) my neighbor (who is a professional builder) came over to check our progress, told us everything is actually pretty solid and the original siding (which you can see on the exposed walls) is called hurricane siding. He said this house will probably make it another 100 years. That was actually a wonderful thing to hear...and 2) I found a new window ($118) and a slab solid core wood door ($63)-woot! The slab wood door is the best option. We can plane it if needed to accommodate for any imperfections. I will lose the window in the door but I am ok with that. We can always add it later if I choose, for now it will be drilled out with a peep hole.

Here's my list from my earlier kitchen remodel post with some additions/ modifications
  • Finish tearing out the plaster and lathe on the North wall
  • Cut out the wall boards in the sink area to remove mold. It appears to be contained in a few spots. Decided to do a complete tear out
  • Patch/ repair the remaining 2 walls. Possibly skim coat. Decided to do a complete tear out
  • Build temporary supports for new headers over door and window.
  • Bleach and Odo-Ban the walls and ceiling, allow to dry. 
  • Possibly Kilz the walls. 
  • Cut out a  2 foot by 8 foot floor section (sink area)
  • Sister the joist beams and shim where the floor slopes
  • Determine if sill plate needs repaired  Damage is minimal-yay!
  • Install a floor jack on North-East corner--where the the sill plate is water damaged
  • Move the stove outlet from floor to the wall and update to a new receptacle
  • Install necessary outlet for gas hookup (no connection to line, preparing in advance for stove replacement)--Maybe--checking on requirements
  • Lay a new subfloor
  • Replace, update and attach the outlet to a stud on east wall
  • Add 1-2 new receptacle(s) to the east wall (window wall)
  • Move junction box, update and wire in a wall switch for the ceiling fixture. Retain original location and use track lighting.
  • Replace the window
  • Attach furring strips to the exterior walls (North and East) to bump out the depth
  • Insulate and seal. minimize any possible cracks, leaks or vermin/bug/ draft entry points
  • Drywall, mud, tape, prime and paint




Wednesday, September 25, 2013

GRILL ALL THE FOODS!

source

We are certainly giving the grill a workout during our kitchen remodel. The grill has become my cook top and oven.   We have a  local place I can take the tank and get it filled for $10 on Tuesday's. We have a couple of extra tanks and this is a cheap way to make sure we have a couple of  back-up tanks.

I found this neat little diagram that explains the thermodynamics of how a grill works which actually helped to determine where to place items on the grill when cooking.
source
And while our situation is not an emergency, I came across some good tips for emergency grilling (when the power is out or maybe a kitchen remodel IS an emergency)

How about a handy dandy Gas Grill cooking chart?

Besides making the requisite burgers, hot dogs, chicken, steaks, chops and foil veggie packets, I have baked biscuits, griddle french toast, baked cornbread, baked chicken tenders with fries, cooked meatloaf, toasted garlic bread and baked a pizza-- all on the grill. The side burner has been great for making mashed potatoes, frying bacon, gravy (for sausage gravy) and making pots of spaghetti. It is almost like being on a camping trip  but without sleeping on the ground, lol.
Indirect heat, 350°F
Direct heat, low, 200°F
Meatloaf, Indirect heat, top rack, 350°F

The pizza was a little tricky when I tried to bake it on the grill. The first time I baked my pizza (from scratch), I used a disposable foil pan which was more heat reflective, the grill was a tad hot and I had too much direct heat.  It wasn't  horribly burnt but definitely more well done than I like, but the hubbs loved it. Go figure... 


The 2nd  time I cooked a pizza it was a semi-defrosted frozen pizza, I used my pizza stone and set the grill to medium-low heat. That kept the temperature around  300°F. And it worked  ok except it still was not perfect. The bottom of the crust was nicely browned, the cheese was hot but not quite toasted. And I forgot to take a picture anyway. It was still pretty tasty despite the flaws.  3rd time is a charm...right?

Actually the weather has been cooperative so I haven't minded all the grilling. It has also given me an opportunity to use my cast iron cookware which I don't use often with my electric stove. There is just something magic about cast iron skillets and a gas cook top. Although the hubbs did say, "Since you are so good at cooking on the grill, maybe we should get a gas stove." GASP! Did he just make a positive suggestion towards the remodel?! HA! I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to have a dual fuel stove with gas cook top and electric oven. Alas, my budget can't stretch to accommodate new appliances. However, we are going to install the fittings without making a connection to the gas line for now, so we have it for the upgrade in the hopefully not so near future.

Then the hubbs dropped this little pearl of wisdom, "I bet since you are so good at cooking on the grill, you won't want to cook in the kitchen when it is finished." Shush up your mouth hubbs! I miss my kitchen and it's crappy stove. I will be glad to not grill for a while...like next summer just MIGHT be to soon...

And I broke down and bought a toaster oven
Grilled french fries are just not my thing!




Tuesday, September 17, 2013

My outdoor space looks like dookie

Another summer season has come to an end  but brought with it a list of things to do...

The hubbs took down the potable pool and now it looks like a spaceship landed in my yard

Drying the pool solar cover reminds of a prom dress gone so very wrong

I need to clean out and put away my portable greenhouse turned  pool storage

I need to mow down and rototil garden up because it is an overgrown and weedy mess

I need to trim the Weigela that is threatening to overtake the porch

I need toclean out and take down the flower boxes with their scraggly and crispy from the heat plant remains

The ONLY thing that looks remotely lush and lovely are my marigolds which exploded in size. No need to worry about insects in this bed next year or the one after that, haha.

How about you-Are you lamenting that summer is over or all the work it brings?




Sunday, September 15, 2013

Redneck Farmhouse Sink (How to wash dishes during a kitchen remodel)

We are 1 week (really? only 1 week? It feels sooo much longer!) into our kitchen remodel. My refusal to wash dishes in the bathtub during our kitchen remodel lasted all of 4 days...sigh...

First-it is seriously gross for me to think about dishes and the bathroom in the same space. yuck!  Second-I really have no other place to wash them. I keep the shower curtain closed where my dish washing station is set up. No-one is allowed to use the downstairs bathroom if at any point I have dishes on the drying rack. It doesn't matter if the curtain closed. It completely skeeves me out!! What can I say I have issues, haha

I suppose my other two option would be to move the "dish wash station" outside but then I would  need to haul hot water and quite frankly it is getting a little nippy outside. Or set something up in the creepy dungeon/cellar/ basement but there are spiders, an occasional mouse or two and usually a snake down there...so that would be a big fat NO!  Icky bathroom it is, bleh


Brittany from Pretty Handy Girl blog had a very cool idea on using a cooler as a farmhouse sink, so I can't claim it as my idea. And you know what? It is an AWESOME idea. I have my cooler/ redneck farmhouse sink sitting on a plastic step stool to raise the height, so there isn't as much hunching over the tub and the dish drainer is on a metal table, also elevated to avoid the tub hunch.



To avoid any junk clogging the cooler or worse-my tub- the dishes are scraped and pre-rinsed outside with the hose. Any accumulated dirty dishes get tossed in the cooler and lid closed until I can deal with them which is usually before I go to bed.  I like having use of the shower sprayer and when you are done just open the drain spout on the cooler. It is genius I say!

  The water stays nice and toasty for quite a while since the cooler holds heat  being insulated and all.  Which is good because I am only washing dishes once a day. I usually soak the dishes for about an 30-40 minutes while I take the dogs out, take the garbage out and usually work on some laundry at the same time. I am really trying to limit the amount of dishes we are using (it is primarily pots/ pans since we are using paper/ disposable plastic for the dishes and cutlery) because I don't  like hand washing dishes anyway,  especially hunched over the bath tub...

Ain't nobody got time for that!

I am REALLY regretting not remodelling the bathroom/ laundry room area first. I had planned on installing a utility sink and small laundry folding counter. Which in hindsight would have been perfect for a dish wash station. And a cheaper remodel project. oops. Oh well, live and learn. I will know better if we ever do this type of thing again.  Which is most likely never!

Anyone have any good tips for managing the chores while living through a kitchen remodel?



Friday, September 13, 2013

Grilled Biscuits

We are 5 days into our kitchen remodel and the urge for baked goods is driving me crazy. I thought we could plug the stove in the garage if we needed to use the oven bit the hubbs was mistaken on the receptacle. We have 110, 210- 3 phase and 440 in the garage (for arc welding) but no 220 for a stove...wah wah.

So I decided to search the web because surely somewhere, somehow, and someone has "baked" on a grill. And sure enough, I found exactly what I was looking for HERE.

My grill was heated to 350°F. I added 2 tbs of Crisco to my cast iron skillet and let it sit on the grill (indirect heat) for 15 minutes, to melt the shortening and get nice and hot while I made my biscuits. 

For ease of preparation I used a box biscuit mix and to be honest I have no idea where any of my stuff is right now even if I did want to make these from scratch. I added just a tad more milk to make my batter less stiff but not runny. 


I originally tried to mix my ingredients in the Ziploc bag with a spoon and then thought "DUH! Just squish the bag to mix it!"  Which is what I did and  it was waayyy easier.


I snipped the corner of the bag to "pipe" my biscuits into the hot pan. 


The pan was placed back on the grill (indirect heat), close the lid and let cook for 10-12 minutes without disturbing or opening the grill.


After 10-12 minutes I rotated the pan, closed the lid and let the biscuits continue to cook another 10-12 minutes. The biscuits were beautifully browned, slightly crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside. In other words-- perfect!


This would be an excellent way to make biscuits if camping. You could premix all the dry ingredients for the biscuits in a Ziploc bag. Add in the rest, "knead" in the bag, pipe in the pan and cook.No muss, no fuss.  The hubbs LOVED these biscuits even though they weren't my scratch biscuits. He asked me would I make them like this even when I have my stove and I said I was considering it!